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Living Simply in a Dumpster

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Professor Wilson went to the dumpster not just because he wished to live deliberately, and not just to teach his students about the environmental impacts of day-to-day life, and not just to gradually transform the dumpster into “the most thoughtfully-designed, tiniest home ever constructed.” Wilson’s reasons are a tapestry of these things. Until this summer, the green dumpster was even less descript than it is now. There was no sliding roof; Wilson kept the rain out with a tarp. He slept on cardboard mats on the floor.

Dumpster Pools Hit the Streets of Manhattan This Summer!

If you’re one of the lucky few who got to make a splash in last summer’s ‘Dumpster Pools’ in Brooklyn, or if you were in the bunch that had to swelter in the heat for lack of an invite, here’s some great news that is sure to cool you down. The Bloomberg administration will open three Dumpster Pools for the first three Sundays of August on the east side of Park Avenue between the closed off streets 40th and 41st.

Trash-to-liquid could be in Augusta first

City and state officials are in early discussions with a company that wants to build what it says would be the first plant in the United States to use a gasification process to turn municipal solid waste into liquid fuel, most likely bio-diesel. Eastern Green Energy LLC proposes to build a $20 million trash-to-liquid fuel plant.

Recycling in America In the bin

It is also hard to increase the quantity of recycled goods without compromising quality. Many cities now give residents bigger bins and demand less sorting, but the often-contaminated results are a costly headache for recycling companies. “We get soiled diapers and dead animals on the line,” complains James Devlin of ReCommunity, which operates 35 recycling facilities in 13 states. One recycling bin ended up holding a six-foot shark.

Seeking Recyclable Materials From a Mixed Wastestream

n Part 1 of this series, author Daniel P. Duffy explained the characteristics of municipal solid waste and the potential of extracting recyclable materials from a mixed wastestream. As Duffy wrote in the previous segment:

With 'Single-Stream' Recycling, Convenience Comes At A Cost

Single stream

In many municipalities around the country, the days of sorting your recyclables for curbside pickup are long gone, replaced by a system called "single stream" recycling. But what happens after all those bits of plastic, paper, glass and metal get put in the bin?

Because it's often collected by the same workers who pick up the garbage, it's easy to wonder if the recyclables make their way to the dump, too. But single-stream recycling ends up at a place called a materials recovery facility.

Augusta Household Hazardous Waste Event

Augusta Household Hazardous Waste Event/ Drop off day : HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE, UNWANTED MEDICATION/SHARPS, COMPUTER MONITORS AND TV’S

GOOD RECYCLING HABITS

Recycling can be beneficial to your finances and it can help save the planet at the same time. Many people believe that recycling is not cost effective, but the truth is that you can recycle daily and save money at the same time. This type of recycling is more than taking in scrap metals and receiving monetary value in return. The recycling you can do everyday in your home is simple little changes to your lifestyle. Something that everyone can do and it creates an impact on the environment.

WM looks to make unprofitable recycling customers profitable

In Waste Management Inc. parlance, it's called a business improvement plan and it involves taking a hard look at the profitability of each trash collection customer.

Customers that weren't meeting profit expectations were given price increases or they were allowed to walk away.

Now with the decrease in recycling commodity prices during the past year, as well as an increase in contamination within the different material streams, Waste Management is looking to do the same thing on the recycling side of the business.

Landfill mining could be future of recycling

The Scottish Government has commissioned a feasibility study from Zero Waste Scotland, which is due to report this spring.

The magazine Materials Recycling World says Scotland is thought to be the first UK authority to ­consider “landfill mining” to extract valuable materials such as plastic and metal.

Other items could be used to heat homes by fuelling incinerators producing energy from waste.

And mining could extract precious “rare earth” materials used in electronics such as mobile phones.

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